تدوينتي: مذكرات منقبة سابقة في ذا ديلي بيست


http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/10/30/saudi-activist-manal-al-sharif-on-why-she-removed-the-veil.html

Saudi Activist Manal Al-Sharif on Why She Removed the Veil

One of Saudi Arabia’s preeminent activists, who led the right-to-drive movement, describes her decision to take off the niqab.
No piece of cloth throughout history has sparked more controversy as the veil. Many Muslim women are forced to wear it daily. The hijab has a spectrum, of course, from its most radical embodiments, the niqab, which covers the entire face, to loose fitting headscarves.

Saudi Arabia comes come second only to Iran in using the power of the stick (the Committee for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice or the religious police) to impose a particular form and color of hejab on all our women. And when I say all our women, I mean all: Saudi and non-Saudi, Muslim and non-Muslim alike.

The sheer size of the country means that each and every region of Saudi Arabia contains a great diversity of cultures, dialects and religious sects. Until the seventies, women here were free to wear almost whatever they wanted. Bedouin women wore bright clothes and burqas, the parting of their hair and their kohl-lined eyes left exposed. The women of the city donned their abayas, the fabric drawn in around their waists. The Arab women wore their colored hejabs, and the non-Muslim women dressed modestly and without a veil.

The women in my father’s village, Tarfa, to the north-west of Mecca, wore bright clothes with pink and white scarves wrapped around their heads and necks. Like the Bedouins, they left their faces and the parting of their hair exposed.

This all changed when the state-supported wave of religious fanaticism struck our society. The black abaya and facial covering was imposed on all female government employees, and on schools and universities. And the black hejab was imposed on all non-Saudi women, regardless of their religion or creed. It was unthinkable to see a woman in my hometown, Mecca, who did not wear the niqab; revealing your face was a social taboo and was haram in the eyes of religion. Leaflets were widely distributed during that era saying that facial covering was what separated the Muslim woman from the infidel. The fanaticism spread even to children: even before I took off my niqab for good, a ten-year-old-girl next to me on a plane called me an “infidel” when I lifted my veil to eat a meal.

One leaflets distributed during the period of Islamic awakening read:

“My Muslim sister; today, you face a relentless and cunning war waged by the enemies of Islam with the purpose of reaching you and removing you from your impenetrable fortress. One of the things that these enemies of Islam are trying to discredit and eliminate is the hejab. Some of them even said that the situation in the East would not be righted until the hejab had been raised from the woman’s face and used to cover the Koran!”

This same ideology was exported out of Saudi Arabia by the power of the petrodollar. I remember the days of the Bosnian war (1992—1995), when Saudi Arabia sent convoys of aid to those besieged in Sarajevo. The people in charge of the convoys distributed the hejab to the besieged women along with the cartons of food.

It came to the point where the only acceptable interpretation of Islamic hejab in Saudi was for woman to shroud her face and body completely in black. Though, to anyone from outside our borders, one Saudi woman appeared utterly indistinguishable from the next, Saudis developed a unique ability to recognize the woman who languished in the blackness. My father knew me apart from the dozens of other girls outside the school or university walls; he never mixed me up with another girl. Similarly, we never failed to recognize our relatives or friends if we came across them in the mall or mosque.

We developed a great sensitivity to the characteristics and attributes of those around us: their voices, the way they arranged their niqab, their eyes, their gait, and even the type of abaya and handbag and shoe they wore. And young men developed a sense for the age of a girl and her physique, purely from the way she walked.

After that came the nineties, which brought with it satellite channels, and after that the turn of the millennium, which heralded the evolution of new forms of communication: the internet and smart phones. At last we had access to views that challenged the status quo—the single opinion that had so long been presented to us as the only correct choice. It was the only one, we were told, which follows the way of the Prophet and truly represents Islam. Our conservative society began to posit questions and raise doubts about things that had—by the power of religion and with the blessing of the state—been so long imposed on us as givens.

One of the first things to be questioned was the narrow Wahhabi interpretation of hejab, but for me personally, that didn’t make the matter any easier. When I decided to remove the niqab in 2002, I faced a bitter war with my family and society. My mother wore the niqab during the period of the Islamic awakening, and though she relinquished it on our travels outside Saudi, she opposed the fact that I had taken it off at home. The reason was social, not religious: “My daughter, no one will marry you if you show your face!”

If the people I passed on the streets of Mecca knew me to be a Saudi, I’d face harsh and disapproving looks. One day I was performing tawaf, and the observer—whose job was to regulate the movements of people around the Kaaba—berated me loudly about my lack of niqab every time I passed him. “Cover your face, woman!” he shouted. The third time, I used my finger to indicate the people around me: “All these women with uncovered faces; are they disobedient too? Or is it only me that’s sinning, because I am Saudi?” I completed the rest of my circuits without hearing another word.

Though I didn’t wear the niqab in the street or in my place of work, I had to borrow a friend’s niqab to enter the courtroom, since women were not allowed to enter government facilities—courts in particular—with their faces uncovered. I was forced to bring two male “identity verifiers” to assert who I was, despite the fact that I carried my ID card with me.

While the uncovering of women’s faces might have been the biggest change to happen to Saudi society, it wasn’t the only one women dared to make. A group of girls in Jeddah began to wear colored abayas; soon, robes in grey, navy blue and dark brown could be seen in the city’s abaya shops. When these same colors began to appear in Riyadh, the religious police launched a campaign of confiscating them from the shops. “If this was their reaction to brown and grey,” I wondered, “how would they react to the sight of pink or red?” I wanted to try it out.

I went to the shop I usually dealt with and asked if they could make me a colorful abaya, but the owner flatly refused: “If a colored abaya was seen in my shop, I would be questioned and harassed by the men of the religious police!” But my friends pointed me to one of the shops that was happy to custom-make colorful designs and deliver them to its customers out of sight of the religious police.

The other change was in the symbolism of the abaya—its significance was no longer of a religious and social nature only. Rather, it came to be treated wholly as a fashion item, with trends that came and went over time just as with any other item of clothing. We saw the emergence of fashion designers who specialized in creating abayas. They held fashion shows to promote their latest lines.

Depending on the fame of the designer, the quality of the fabric and the materials used in the embroidery, the prices could be as high as tens of thousands of riyals apiece. Different types of abaya emerged for different occasions: the abaya intended for work or for going to the mall was characterized by its practicality, and the abayas for special occasions were characterized by their embroidery and luxurious design. There were even abayas for winter and summer.

In spite of all these changes, the force of the state continued to impose the black abaya in public. Advocates claimed that it helped to preserve virtue and to affirm the application of Sharia law. What they conveniently overlooked was that the imposition of a certain type of dress on one section of the population was a precedent that had never before been set in the whole of the country’s history. The form and color of clothes had long been left to the society to decide for themselves, and the authorities had cared little about how it looked as long as it was decent.

The imposition of the black abaya is unnatural: it represents nothing but an obstruction on normal life and on the natural evolution that occurs in people’s manner and form of dress, something that has occurred throughout history on the basis of people’s needs and changing circumstances.

Manal al Sharif was arrested for driving in Saudi Arabia and is one of the Kingdom’s most famous women’s rights activists

التدوينة بالعربي هنا:

https://manal-alsharif.com/2014/08/10/%D9%85%D8%B0%D9%83%D8%B1%D8%A7%D8%AA-%D9%85%D9%86%D9%82%D8%A8%D8%A9-%D8%B3%D8%A7%D8%A8%D9%82%D8%A9/

Living Two Lives


Every time I leave the country, as I stand before the passport control officer in his usual military attire, I hold my breath on two accounts. My first fear is that a travel ban – an oft-received punishment by people like me, human rights advocates – will see me sent directly back home again.

My second is that my father, my assigned male guardian according to Saudi law, decides to revoke the travel permission he granted me. I can envision my father doing this either out of fear for my own safety or else as a response to the ongoing pressure he receives from people around him or from our al Sharif tribe. It’s strange the way that other countries punish activism with exile, yet in Saudi it’s the other way around: those who protest the system are doomed with internal exile! There is a well-known saying timidly mumbled by Saudis amongst themselves:

“The best place in Saudi is the airport through which I leave the country”.

The moment the passport control officer stamps my passport, an indescribable feeling rushes through my veins. The cage door is open; I’m a free bird once again. But how can one’s own country be a punishment in and of itself?

I could list tens of reasons, but personally I find that the agony of living in duplicity tops them all. The saying I quoted above reveals a lot about the forced duplicitous nature of the Saudi people’s existence: adhering to the the abnormally extreme societal and religious restraints imposed on them on the one hand, and living a normal life – or the life they want to live – on the other.

What follows is a list of just a few examples of duplicity in modern-day Saudi Arabia:

1- Although cinemas are banned in Saudi by law/fatwa, there are more than 170 cinemas in Saudi Arabia. All of them are located in residential compounds that Saudis cannot enter. Now add to that the huge Mega and Virgin stores that sell movies on DVDs, not to mention the fact that most prominent satellite Arab channels are owned and run by Saudi money.

2- Although alcohol is also banned in Saudi, it’s not difficult to find local alcohol dealers who will deliver whatever your heart desires to the privacy of your own home.

3- There are more than 10 million non-Saudis living in Saudi. Everyone knows that they come from different religions (Christianity, Hinduism, etc.) but when it comes to official numbers, Saudi authorities insist that the Saudi Arabia’s population is 100% Muslim.

4- Saudi law bans women from traveling without a Mahram (a male relative that woman cannot marry). But a woman can travel without a Mahram as long as if her “guardian in charge” gives his written permission! Similarly, when it comes to the issue of women driving, fatwas ban women from being alone with a non-mahram even if he is her cousin or brother-in-law. Yet, it is entirely expected that she will use a non-mahram driver.

As a Saudi woman, I am forced to live double the duplicity just to survive. When I got a job offer from Saudi Aramco back in 2002, my family had to guard the fact that their daughter worked in a mixed environment and that I lived alone 850 miles away from the “surveillance” of any male guardian.

Saudi Aramco was the first company in the Kingdom to have men and women work together in the same office space. According to the previous Saudi labor Law, a mixed work environment was prohibited. The new labor law that was passed in 2005 (3 years after I joined Aramco) annulled that particular regulation. It also annulled the rule that required women to have a male guardian’s permission in order to work; nevertheless, most employers in Saudi still require it. I remember the first thing a friend said to me when she found out that I worked in a mixed environment: “You will never get married”. The irony: I married a Saudi co-worker, whom I later divorced.

Hypocrisy is also very useful when dealing with impractical and sometimes absurd laws. Take the Ministry of Higher Education as an example. There are now over 27,500 female students participating in the King Abdullah international scholarship program. My elder sister, a doctor, was one of them, until they stopped her scholarship benefits two years ago. The reason? She was not accompanied by a male family member while studying abroad. Ministry of Higher Education official statistics show that half of applicants to the program are females, but the number who are actually eligible is reduced dramatically by their inability or unwillingness to comply with this bizarre requirement, which authorities argue is based on Islamic fatwa. Those who have basic knowledge of Sharia (Islamic law) know that only one of the four Sunna scholars considers a Mahram (companion) to be a mandatory requirement for a female traveling abroad. So a male companion while residing in another country is not required!

Female students come up with creative workarounds to be able to study abroad. Some marry (on paper) just for the sake of having a male companion, and when they travel abroad, each of the marital partners leads their own life until the program is finished. Other female students take the male companion for the first few weeks to finish the paperwork and show a face at the Cultural Attaché office.

When I was detained in 2011 and sent to jail for being a woman driving a car, I met Hana, a 26-year-old woman who was waiting for more than a year for her male guardian to bail her out. Even when a Saudi woman prisoner has served her sentence, she cannot be released until her appointed male guardian has bailed her out. I brought Hana’s issue to the jail warden’s attention. He told me he was aware of her problem, a common one when the girl’s family is ashamed by her and refuse to accept her back, and that he was in the process of finding her a husband to bail her out! I couldn’t believe my ears!

Officials say that they are applying Sharia laws, while clerics say that they are protecting customs and traditions. At the same time, society enshrines customs and traditions, while laws codify them. It is all becoming a big mishmash where you have no clue who is responsible and who is to blame for the enforced living of a double life or for Saudi’s attempts to build an Islamic Utopia on behalf of the whole Muslim world, even when a large number of us are just pretending rather than genuinely believing in it. I once read a funny comment on this polemic situation: “Saudi authorities solve the world’s problems with money, and Saudi problems with fatwas”.

Hypocrisy in the Saudi system extends from officials to its religious establishment, with a knock-on effect in its society.. The infamous Saudi cleric Al Arifi, who happens to be the most followed Arab on Twitter, is the perfect embodiment of the religious establishment’s dilemma: it must strike a balance between preserving its grip on the Saudi society, which it does through rigid interpretation and intolerance to difference, such as the Shia’a, whilst simultaneously gaining acceptance from an international community that does not welcome displays of intolerance. Al Arifi is known for tweeting opinions of hate against the Shia’a in the Middle East, and encouraging Saudi youth to go for jihad in Syria against the infidel Alawi. Surprisingly, however, all those views were overturned on his last visit to London. The headlines about his visit went something like this: “Al Arifi calls Sunna and Shia’a to unite and renounce differences”!!

Living a double life creates so much pressure on those forced to do so., You get a sense of this when reading Saudi tweets, the only podium where we can voice our views. The tweets usually revolve around three things:

1- Harsh criticism of one another and extreme curiosity about others’ personal lives. People show off the superiority of their own faith by questioning the conduct of others..

2- Harsh attacks against Shia’a and anyone who is different. If you are different, then you are our enemy, even if your opinion is the only thing that is different about you.

3- Harsh attacks on anyone who dares to question clerics or challenge a status quo.

Surprisingly, Saudis who live abroad seldom tweet about such issues! Or if they do, at least not in such harsh way. Maybe because they are relieved from the daily pressure we face within Saudi that causes everyone to get on your nerves as a result of the slightest interaction.

I have always wondered how to end the agony of living two lives, following two standards, being two-faced… It has to start with the people in power; here I mean the government and the religious establishment, and I am witnessing some progress. The government uses religion to control people, but when religion tries to control the government, things don’t go so smoothly. When the religious establishment tried to stop women from being part of the Shura Council in September 2011, for example, the government completely ignored their demands.

It was a big debate in Saudi, probably the second biggest after the debate on women driving. The same religious establishment that is known for resisting almost every new thing that arrives in Saudi ends up making heavy use of that thing almost every time. TV, radio, women’s education, satellite dishes, internet, camera phones and social media, to name a few. The excuse is always that they are using it for a good cause. But the truth is that people obey at the start and boycott, then with time, you find everyone using what was initially declared haram.

I see more and more Saudis, especially the young ones, stand up for what they believe in, even if it earns them a great deal of criticism and attacks. I see them challenge the once-unchallengeable, mostly when they come back from abroad and start realising the comparisons. For me it’s a baby step, but this is how babies learn to walk! One day, when my daughter makes decisions about her major in school, whether or not to wear hijab, the husband she wishes to marry, the movie she wants to watch in the cinema, I will know she will not feel what I feel every time I leave Saudi. Because she will be as true to herself there as she is anywhere else in the world!

Published April 18, 2014
http://www.islamistgate.com/596

When will Saudi women drive?


Every time I meet someone from outside Saudi Arabia, the conversation always ends in the same question: “How long do you think it will be before women in Saudi are allowed to drive?”

I wish I had a simple answer for this issue, which should, by basic human rights, be much less complex than it is. But before I address this, I will answer another common question: “Why don’t – or rather can’t – women drive in Saudi Arabia?”

In fact, the Saudi government has never issued a royal decree stipulating the ban, nor even imposed a system. (In Saudi Arabia, there are systems rather than laws: from a religious point of view, laws are considered to be in violation of Shari’ah, because they come from a human perspective).

The ban is merely based on the Ministry of Interior, which was issued in 1990 in response to the first women’s movement demanding the right to drive. The decree, which forbids women to drive on Saudi Arabian territory, did not specify a punishment.

It was reasserted by the Ministry on October 25, 2013, one day before the date on which Saudi women had chosen to launch a third driving campaign which is still held on a monthly basis.

As represented in statements given by the new Interior Minister Mohamed bin Naif and his father who was the former Interior Minister, Naif bin Abdulaziz, both insist that the Interior Ministry is an executive and not a legislative body, that it is not responsible for the ban.

If we examine the Basic System of Governance, which corresponds to something like a constitution in the rest of the world, Article 8 states “governance in Saudi Arabia is to be conducted on the basis of justice, equality and consultation in accordance with Shari’ah”. And if we look at the Saudi system relating to traffic, we do not find any provision or stipulation preventing women from obtaining a driving licence.

These are the only two sources we have to consider in connection with this issue. The statement released by the Ministry of Interior in 1990 is rendered null and void by the fact that it was not based on the governing system.

But on the occasions that I and many others have tried to obtain a driver’s licence from the traffic department, we have been surprised, upon entering our identification numbers into the relevant system, to find an error message appearing on the screen: “The ID number entered belongs to a woman, it is not possible for a woman to obtain a driving licence”.

When I raised the issue with the administrative court in November 2011, wishing to make a case against the General Directorate of Traffic, and pointing out the lack of legal ban preventing a licence being issued to me, my case was referred to a special committee at the Ministry of Interior. In other words, to the very party I wished to prosecute.

When you hear the words “special committee” in Saudi Arabia, you know your case has been relegated to oblivion. And this has remained my fate until today.

We can conclude from all this that the Interior Minister is the executive body as well as being the issuer of the ban and the body that upholds it, which contradicts the statements made by both the Saudi Interior Ministers.

Now, a review of some of the reasons people give for the ban. Firstly, financial: influential families control the visa market for drivers. If they allowed women to drive, these families would lose huge financial returns from a market in which official figures indicate the existence of around a million drivers and which unofficial numbers suggest could contain as many as two million.

And secondly, a fatwa issued by Sheikh Abdulaziz bin Baz, issued concurrently with the Ministry of Interior’s 1990 decree and forbidding driving based on the Islamic principle of prohibiting that which might eventually lead to sin.

The justifications cited by the prohibition fatwa are nothing more than suppositions about what will happen to society if women are allowed to drive.

This has led to a situation in which denying women the right to drive, something which has no basis in the Muslim law, has taken precedence over prohibiting women to be alone with a non-Mahram male (which is prohibited in Shari’ah), as the woman inevitably must be chauffeured around.

In my opinion, the real reason is much simpler than all this. If a woman had asserted their right to drive since the day cars arrived in Saudi Arabia, it would by now be a routine matter and we would be dealing with none of the current clamour and uproar.

This is the reason that Bedouin women and women from the countryside drive comfortably outside of the city without being subject to hindrance or criticism. The banning of women from driving in the city is a result of the system of state that has been systemically imposed upon it; women in Saudi Arabia are considered minors under the law until the day that they die.

We will return now to the question that, in recent times, has become an ever more frequent topic of discussion: when will women in Saudi Arabia be able to drive? Many assume that the issue of allowing women to drive will be resolved with a royal decree, as happened with the appointment of 30 women in the Shura council in September 2011.

This decision, which was followed closely by many parties interested in the Saudi state of affairs, represented an attempt to improve the image of Saudi Arabia after a scandal involving an imprisoned woman driver garnered widespread attention.

But those who know anything about the distribution of power in Saudi Arabia know that there are several different competing parties within the royal family, each with its own ideologies and interests.

They also recognise that King Abdullah does not have the powers required to issue such a decree, and that the subject of women driving is entirely in the hands of the Interior Minister Mohammed bin Naif; the King has no authority when it comes to this department.

Will a positive decision be issued by the Ministry of Interior? That seems improbable. More than 24 years after the first attempt to abolish the women’s driving ban, there seems not to have been a single breakthrough; there are no driving schools for women, nor any female traffic police.

Saudi police are still intent on stopping any woman who dares to drive, booking her car and summoning her guardian-in-charge to sign a pledge not to allow her to do so.

The authorities, in effect, show no leniency towards women drivers, as we who were demanding the right to drive hoped they might have done. The authorities also worry that responding to demands to allow women to drive will damage the prestige of the state and open the door to other popular demands for social and perhaps political change.

When will women be able to drive? We must recognise that the Bedouin woman never ceased –since the horse and donkey were replaced with the car, or the side-dagger with a rifle – to use new inventions to ease her life and affairs. Whether in the farmlands or the desert of Saudi Arabia, not one of her fellow men dared to doubt her chastity, her morals or her religious belief.

Meanwhile, the woman of the city has willingly parted with her rights and allowed everyone to compromise them, or else to use them for political gain or as a red herring to distract people from more salient issues.

In my opinion, freedom is a personal decision, not a political one. When the Saudi woman realises this fact, she will get in her car and drive it as many times as it takes for it to become a common sight, forcing the authorities to regulate the phenomenon rather than prosecute it.

And when she learns that rights are seized rather than granted, she will recognise how to eliminate the male dominion that has been imposed on her and cast her as a minor her whole life.

http://www.islamistgate.com/566

Activist: Women still can’t drive in Saudi Arabia, but ‘things are changing’


By Bonnie Washuk, Staff Writer

Lewiston-Auburn |

Wednesday, September 18, 2013 at 11:35 pm

LEWISTON — There’s a New England connection to the woman who
received worldwide attention in 2011 for being being jailed for driving in
Saudi Arabia, a country where it is illegal for women to drive.
Activist Manal al­Sharif spoke to a packed Bates College audience
Wednesday night. She’s been named by Time magazine one of the 100 most
influential people of 2012, written about by the New York Times, CNN and
the Wall Street Journal, been given international awards for freedom and
called “fearless.”
Al­Sharif said she started the “Women2Drive” movement after living and
working in Nashua, N.H., for a year.
The right for Saudi Arabian women to drive is symbolic, she explained, for
the guardianship system that exists in Saudi Arabia, where women are
considered “minors” all of their lives. Women must ask permission to do
anything, even leaving the house, from their male “guardians” — fathers,
husbands or, for widows, even their sons.
When she came to Nashua in 2009 on a work exchange program, the
computer engineer discovered there was no public transportation. She
needed a car, but first needed a license.
She signed up for drivers ed, learning how to drive with teenagers.
Beaming, al­Sharif showed off her drivers license to the audience to
applause. After living like an American for a year, she returned to her
country and became frustrated by not being mobile.
Saudi women travel the world, work as doctors and save lives, yet they
need a man for transportation. “Something is wrong here,” she said.
Instead of complaining, she acted.
In May of 2011, on Facebook she called on women to drive. She got support
and threats that women who drove would be raped. Women were scared. In
June, al­Sharif took the lead saying, “’I’ll show you, I’ll drive.” She drove
her car for 10 minutes as a friend shot video. “I had no clue what would
happen after that,” she said.
The video was posted on YouTube and became a worldwide hit. She was
arrested and jailed for nine days.
Bonnie Washuk, Staff WriterNews of the arrest went out on Twitter. “It was really amazing what social
media created,” she said. “It created a global support system.”
It was the time of Arab Spring. The world reacted in anger to a woman
jailed for simply driving.
“People around the world called for my release. This small act created a
huge wave.” Al­Sharif showed a picture of a Romanian woman protesting
with a sign, “Cars for women, camels for men.”
Al­Sharif’s family went to the king and apologized for her behavior. She was
released. Al­Sharif suspects it was the pressure from social media that
contributed to her release.
In the United States, people use social media to meet old friends or keep in
touch with family. “In our world, we use it to start revolutions.”
Saudi conservatives slammed her and the idea of women driving. “This is
my favorite,” al­Sharif said, showing a newspaper article with a headline of
a cleric warning if women were allowed to drive, the virginity of unmarried
women would be lost. He said there’d be illegitimate children and more
divorce.
Supporters of the “Women2Drive” campaign posted the story online. “It
was all over the news,” al­Sharif said. “The whole world was mocking
them.”
Eventually, she ended up losing her job and had to move. Today she lives in
Dubai. When she goes back to Saudi Arabia to visit her son (her ex­husband
has custody), she gets detained at security. When public speaking, “it’s
balancing when to say so much,” she said. “Sometimes you say something
huge and you disappear for two months.”
Saudi women still cannot drive. They are still “minors” of their fathers,
husbands and sons. But a change is underway, al­Sharif said.
She’s written against the guardianship system, expecting flack. That didn’t
happen. Some men agreed, saying they were sick of their woman depending
on them for every single thing.
“It’s changing, slowly,” al­Sharif said. “It’s not going to happen today, but
maybe it will happen in my daughter’s generation, if I ever have one.”
Her son will hear bad things about what she’s done, she said. Someday he’ll
ask her about it. “When he comes that day, I will have an answer,” al­Sharif
said.
But if her son ever becomes her guardian, “I’ll kick his butt,” she said to
laughter.

bwashuk@sunjournal.com

http://www.sunjournal.com/news/lewiston-auburn/2013/09/18/activist-women-still-cant-drive-saudi-arabia-thing/1424989

I hate you but won’t leave you


The comments that I receive in my email and on my pages in social networking sites make me happy whether an encouragement or criticism. May Allah have mercy upon whoever reveals to me my faults, old people say…

I also receive my share of insults and ignore them, in accordance with the saying of Imam Shafi’i: “If the fool speaks, don’t respond to him as silence is the best answer (for him). If you (do) speak to him (then) you have supported him (i.e. his foolishness by giving him importance); and if you left him (without speaking/answering), then in anguish he dies.”

However, there are types of comments, that I receive, make me wonder in which category they belong to. I mean comments such as; « how I hate » or « I looked for your page just to inform you about my hatred towards you ». There is a very weird person who, whenever I post something on my page, leaves a very long comment that starts with mocking my profile picture and my forehead, passing through the usual betrayal charges, and concluding with a cursing prayer for me and whomever read for me without leaving one comment on the article itself! This reminds me of the famous Hijazi saying: «I swear to God I would never leave you not for sake of love but for annoying you».

I tried repeatedly to understand how a person would waste all this time and effort, not only of having all this hatred for others but of also searching for them to express this hatred. I consider hatred is one of the most negative emotions that only kills a person just as fire burns wood.  Rarely this feeling affects the person we hate, and rarely he cares to know what we feel towards him, especially if he is not part of our personal lives. Once I wrote jokingly in «twitter»; «I have never faced threats and feelings of hatred except in the cyber world, and I have never met one of them face to face in the real world! cowards! ». I received immediate mentions from three people confirm their deep hatred for me, and their willingness to meet me in person to express these feelings. None of them live in the nearby, therefore, I sent them my Skype ID to make a  video call to understand this enthusiasm to hatred … None called until today!

Someone once said, “My friend was harshly insulting you. Therefore, I asked him “Have you heard from her?” He replied,” I heard from people” and I asked him again “Did you read any of her articles, or watch one of her interviews?” He answered, “No, I did not want to, but people say …”  I interrupted him saying, “People, people, nothing destroyed us but people!”. My simple answer to his friend is this, if the conception formation of a person depended on the words of people, then what is the benefit of the mind that God gave us?  The friend of that person reminds me of myself during my teenage years. A wild campaign against the late Dr. Ghazi al-Gosaibi has been launched describing him of being atheist and prohibiting reading his “impudent” books. Being influenced by such harsh opinions, I hated this person until I read one of his books by accident. At that moment I regretted having not read all of his books, and for my feelings of hatred towards him without proof … I learned then that every story has two sides thus, never make one sided judgements. Listen to both sides and then “Follow your heart, even if you were told otherwise“.

I conclude my article with this e-mail that has touched me a lot:

(For the first time I read for you. Much of what I have towards you has changed. I knew you initially through the topic of Women2Drive and its consequences, surely from newspapers, social networking sites, and from people talk. However, I’m a person who does not believe in any cause, the strange thing is according to the increasing gossip of others, I automatically hated you.

Your article was as a making up meeting between you and me. It released me from all the negative emotions that I felt towards you, and not because of your attitudes as I told you before!

In all cases, the value of our life lies in the struggle for a lawful right no matter how we suffered.)

Congratulation for your marriage to another man…. My Love


During a session of “girl’s talk”, where Eve enjoys backbiting Adam, this story was mentioned:

“He called to find her crying. He asked; what is wrong?

She replied; I had a marriage proposal and I should go now to meet his mother.

He said; Wipe your tears my love, to not destroy your beauty in front of my mother.”

The local version

“He called to find her crying. He asked; what is wrong?

She replied; I had a marriage proposal and I should go now to meet his mother.

He said; Wipe your tears my love to go to meet his mother. He might be better than me and love you more than me. Congratulation for marriage in advance!”

Many comments from anti-Eastern men followed this story. Comments like: “men hold a girl in suspense for years with dreams and illusions of getting married, then when he wants to get married, she is the furthest option of his future wife”. Another: “even if he married her, he will keep considering this a favour of him or he will humiliate her because she fell in love before marriage, and some cases he might doubt her or marry again.”

These were my friends’ comments however; I had a point of view that Eve might not agree with:

It is easier to blame others for our misfortunes. Eastern women play the role of the victim like professional inferiors. Men control her whether he is a father or a husband, or even sometimes a brother or a son. Society plays a role in creating this idea when it convinces her that she is less than a man. She cannot take the control of her own affairs, although she is responsible for managing her home affairs. She is not close to the perfection that men have reached despite all their shortcomings. Male will remain superior to female. The worst is when those brand-new habits that underestimate the women turn to be written laws using doubtful hadiths to back them up. I call them brand new habits because they appeared during my Mother’s generation but not in my Grandmother’s generation. – God rest her soul – who raised her children after the death of my grandfather, planted her land and managed her house, her sheep and all her own affairs by herself.

A Mother is blameworthy when she puts in her son’s mind indirectly that he is better than his sister is, allowing for him what is forbidden for his sister to do and ignoring his mistakes while punishing her daughter for committing the same mistake. A girl is blameworthy in case she derives confidence from the number of her suitors. when she sets her sights on the man she loves even if he did not express an intention to marry her, making him all her life while she is only a part of his life which he can replace with another whenever he wants. She is at his disposal, and feels happy for his privilege even if he causes her sadness and forgives his faults, while she does not expect the same.  She has to be an angel, not a normal woman to win his love, his heart and the wedding ring, which she may not ever see.

The wife also is blameworthy when she waives her right of being a full-fledged partner of a man in his life, sharing the same responsibility of housework and raising children. Does the wife know that legitimately she should not serve her husband, or even take his permissions in her personal affairs, yet share his opinion only? Does she know that guardianship means managing her affairs, serving her and not a matter of owner and slave as we see today? Even the divorcee is blameworthy when she gathers all her things in a bag with her broken heart and leaves her marital house believing that this protects her dignity? Ignorant or ignoring that it is her legal right and the right of her children to her house? How did things overturn? Then she asks why does a man humiliate her? However, she humiliated herself first when either she waived her rights out of ignorance or out of love. Eve is the first to be blamed for diminishing her rights, even if it was her moral right to be respected! Yet, the man is one who wrote the rules in the woman’s life and she followed without any questioning!

FACT:

The dream of every man is to be the first in her life; however, the dream of every woman is to be the last in his life.

احذروا العميلة منال الشريف


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بقلم ثامر عدنان
شاكر

مؤلف كتب (هنا تويتر، عاشق من العالم الثالث، حدث العام القادم، قزم عملاق ووطن، عفواً سقط عمداً) و صاحب مدونة (سقط عمداً)

http://sktamdn.blogspot.com/

*منعت صحيفة عكاظ هذا المقال من النشر

أخيراً أنكشف السر.. عُرف من وراء منال الشريف، تلك المرأة التي تعدّت حدود العُرف والتقاليد وكسرت القانون الغير موجود في بلادنا، وقادت سيارة!! أتريدون أن تعرفوا من خلفهاا! ورائها يا سادة ماضٍ غريب عجيب.. يُقال والعياذ بالله أنها كانت متفوقة في دراستها وأنها حصلت على شهادتها الجامعية في علوم الحاسب الآلي مع مرتبة الشرف عام 2002م، وأنها بعد ذلك نالت شهادة الاختراق الالكتروني الأخلاقي كأول سعودية تحصل عل تلك الشهادة، يا لطيف!! لتأخذها العزة بالإثم بعد ذلك وتتجرئ فتنال شهادة مدقق معلومات في الأيزو والتي لا ينالها إلا الصفوة من المتخصصين في أمن المعلومات على مستوى العالم! كان وراء منال الشريف جيشٌ من القلوب الصادقة والوجوه الطيبة التي لم ترضّ بالظلم أن يقع فكتبت ورفعت الأيادي للملك ولرب الملك مناجيةً أن يفك أسرها منذ اللحظة الأولى.. ولأن منال كانت فرداً صالحاً عاملاً منتجاً متفوقاً احتضنتها شركة عملاقة تُسمى أرامكو، وتلك الأرامكو التي يمتاز طاقمها بالثقة والذكاء وكأنهم ولدوا من رحمٍ واحدة وقفت خلفها بكل ما تملك، مثلها مثل طليقها أبو ولدها الوحيد الذي لم يتركها فكان ممن شكرت قائلةً أنها تفتخر بأرامكو وأنها تشكر زوجها السابق لوقفته بجانبها!! وراء تلك العميلة الخطيرة عقلٌ يقظ مُتفتح. في سجلات ماضيها تفوّق مهني وعلمي، تزينه ثقافة امرأة وإطلاع فردٍ مميز وقلبٌ وفيّ معطاء يحلم أن يرى وطنه في المقدمة فكانت بصمتها في كل دربٍ سلكته دون أن تنتظر ترخيصاً من أحد بأن تقود عربة أحلامها في طريق الغد المشرق. مفارقة مضحكة!! تخيلوا فقط بالله عليكم، لو كانت منال من حملة الشهادات الصورية الذين لا يختلفون كثيراً عن الجهلة، وقد وصلت ليلها بنهارها كفاحاً من جبهة صالونات النساء الشهيرة؟!! تخيلوها من تلك الشريحة التي تنتظر مصروف ماما وموافقة بابا على رحلة الصيف المجيدة وتعد الأيام والليالي في ضجر..تخيلوا لو كانت منال تقضي وقتها كل يوم ما بين الأسواق وحكاوي القهاوي، والشيشة والألف قناة.. تخيلوا لو كانت منال من متابعي ميلودي تتحدى الملل، ومن حفُاظ الأفلام البررة الذين يحفظون في كل يومٍ مشهد ولقطة ويعيدونها بكامل تفاصيلها عن ظهر قلب، في تحدٍ صريح لروتانا التي تخبرك أنك مش حتقدر تغمض عينيك!! تخيلوا أنها فردٌ جاهل وحرف زائد على منظومة الحياة السوية؟! اسمحوا لنا بعد كل ذلك العار والماضي المهين أن نستنكر فعلتها وأن نقول بكل فخر أن منال الشريف منال مسعود عابد المنعمي الشريف كانت نجمة طيلة شبابها، ونموذج مشرف لمواطن واعٍ فطن صالح رفض أن يكون رقماً في تعداد سكاني يتزايد، وقرر أن يكون فعلاً وبصمة وصوتاً.. أسمحوا لنا أن نقول أنها اسمٌ أكبر من قضيةٍ تافهة معيبة مُسلّم بها كقيادة المرأة للسيارة.. وأنها أطهر من منابر موبوءة نالت من سمعتها، وألسنة عفنة تجرأت عليها ونهشت عرضها بلا رحمة، فكل هؤلاء الذين ثرثروا لن يذكر التاريخ اسماً منهم في حين سيبقى اسم منال الشريف في الذاكرة طويلاً.. منال كما تقول عن نفسها أنها ليست ناشطة حقوقية، لكنها إنسانة صادقة علمتنا أن النجم الحقيقي ليس نجم المواسم، بل هو ذلك الذي يحمل رسالة ويمضي في مشوار ويُكافح، وأن لا وطن يسمو بضعافه. إن أردت أن تُطالب بحقك ذات يوم فكن على قدر الحياة، عزيمة التغيير لن تولد على يد الضعيف الجاهل وإنما بسواعد الأقوياء الناجحين، الذين يعرفون فقط هم الذين يُطالبون بحقهم، هم من يعشقون أرضهم وكأن معادلة التميز هي معرفة وتفوق زائد حرية مضروبة في ثقة لتكون النتيجة مواطنٌ ذكي لمّاح معطاء يعرف ما له وما عليه دون خوفٍ أو استسلام!! تُبنى الأوطان وتزدان بأمثال منال الشريف، فلا عجب يا حفيدة المصطفى أن تكونين أنتِ.. أنتِ.. دمتم ودام الوطن بألف خير،،،

Women Who Rock the World: Activists Gather for Vital Voices Awards


by Jun 7, 2012 3:27 PM EDT

Firebrands from far-flung corners of the planet converge in D.C. for the Vital Voices Global Leadership Awards. But one Saudi activist is forced to stay home amid death threats. By Abigail Pesta.

Nobel Prize winner Tawakkol Karman started a revolution in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday night. The Yemeni human-rights activist rallied a packed audience at the annual Vital Voices Global Leadership Awards to join her in a rousing chant to vanquish dictators.

vital-voices-pesta-new
Award winners and presenters at the event in Washington. (Sharon Farmer)

“One, two, three, four. Bashir, Assad out the door,” she said in reference to the leaders of Sudan and Syria. “Five, six, seven, eight. Stop the killing, stop the hate.”

The crowd of 2,000 at the Kennedy Center Opera House joined in—somewhat tentatively at first, then more forcefully as Karman kept chanting.

Organizers of the event, hosted by the nonprofit group Vital Voices, which trains women leaders around the world, said afterward at the dinner that they had no idea the rallying cry was on Karman’s agenda. It’s just what happens when you bring together some of the planet’s most powerful voices for peace and human rights.

Karman, who won the Nobel Prize this past fall for her fight for freedom of the press and human rights in Yemen, joined four outspoken activists from across the Middle East onstage: Libyan human-rights lawyer Salwa Bugaighis, Yemeni journalist Shatha Al-Harazi, Tunisian blogger Amira Yahyaoui, and Egyptian women’s rights activist Marianne Ibrahim. All have put themselves in harm’s way through their work, with journalist Al-Harazi receiving death threats after suggesting to Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh at a face-to-face meeting that he resign. The four women shared the Global Trailblazer Award.

A fifth recipient of the award, Manal Alsharif—who caused an uproar in her native Saudi Arabia last year by posting a YouTube video of herself driving a car, in a country where women are famously forbidden to drive—could not attend. Alsharif told organizers of the event that she felt it would be too dangerous for her to do so, as she had received death threats for her activism. Credited with igniting the women’s-right-to-drive movement in her country, Alsharif was profiled by Newsweek this past spring in its “150 Fearless Women” portfolio.

Newsweek & The Daily Beast’s Abigail Pesta interviews Alyse Nelson.

In another poignant moment, Chelsea Clinton described the significance of the Fern Holland Award, named for a young Oklahoma woman who went to Iraq in 2003 with the Coalition Provisional Authority to support the transitional government. In 2004, Holland was shot dead at age 34, in a car in Karbala, along with American press officer Robert Zangas and Iraqi translator Salwa Ourmashi.

Clinton spoke with poise and also a sprinkling of humor, drawing a laugh when she said her mother wants to make the world a better place for the next generation of women—including the grandchildren she hopes to have, soon.

Clinton and Holland’s sister, Viola Holland-Christianson, presented the Fern Holland Award to a death-defying Pakistani filmmaker named Samar Minallah Khan. Through her documentary films, Khan tells the stories that the militants and tribal elders would rather keep silent—such as the stories of young girls given away as domestic slaves to settle family disputes.

Hillary Clinton couldn’t make the event, for the first time in 11 years, as she was on a State Department trip to Turkey, but greeted guests onscreen. She and Madeleine Albright had inspired the nonprofit Vital Voices in 2000, after launching a government initiative in 1997 called the Vital Voices Democracy Initiative, aimed at advancing women’s economic and political roles.

Chelsea Clinton drew a laugh when she said her mother wants to make the world a better place for the next generation of women—including the grandchildren she hopes to have, soon.

The Human Rights Award, presented by fashion designer Diane von Furstenberg, went to Rosana Schaack, the founder of a group in Liberia that works to rehabilitate thousands of former girl soldiers. The group, called Touching Humanity in Need of Kindness, recently expanded to help survivors of rape and women displaced by the country’s long-running civil war, which ended in 2003.

Related Stories

The Leadership in Public Life Award, presented by Tina Brown, editor in chief of the Newsweek Daily Beast Company, along with Luis Moreno, president of the Inter-American Development Bank, went to Ruth Zavaleta Salgado. One of the founders of Mexico’s Party of the Democratic Revolution, which protects and promotes democracy, Salgado works to get women into public office in the country’s notoriously macho-male realm of politics.

Texas Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison and NBC chief foreign-affairs correspondent Andrea Mitchell presented the Economic Empowerment Award to Adimaimalaga Tafuna’i, a Samoan entrepreneur who brought products such as coconut oil from remote Samoan villages to the world through partnerships with companies like the Body Shop. She now runs a group called Women in Business Development, which encourages and supports women entrepreneurs. The soft-spoken Tafuna’i wiped away tears as she thanked Vital Voices for “coming to find us.”

Other speakers at the event included Alyse Nelson, president and chief executive of Vital Voices; Melanne Verveer, director of the State Department’s Office on Global Women’s Issues; Susan Ann Davis, chair of Vital Voices; Carol Lancaster, vice-chair of Vital Voices; Wolf Blitzer, CNN political anchor; Claire Shipman, contributor to Good Morning America; actress Jennifer Morrison; and Kay Krill, president and CEO of Ann Inc., the parent company of Ann Taylor and Loft.

Get Involved: Learn about women and girls around the globe at our Women in the World Foundation.

Like The Daily Beast on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for updates all day long.

Abigail Pesta is an award-winning journalist who has lived and worked around the world, from New York to London to Hong Kong. Currently she is the editorial director of Women in the World at Newsweek and The Daily Beast. She is a former editor-at-large of Marie Claire magazine, and a former news editor at The Wall Street Journal in Hong Kong. She also has worked as an articles editor at Glamour, where she launched Mariane Pearl’s popular column about women changing the world. Abby writes short stories for her website, Fine Words Butter No Parsnips. Follow her on Twitter at @AbigailPesta.

For inquiries, please contact The Daily Beast at editorial@thedailybeast.com.

TIME: The World’s 100 Most Influential People


They entertain us, lead us and challenge us. TIME honors the icons who are defining the world in 2012
TIME 100: The List

Manal al-Sharif

Protester

By Aryn BakerWednesday, Apr. 18, 2012
dek

Abduljalil Al-Nasser

With its vast, unpopulated deserts, low-slung buildings and cheap oil, Saudi Arabia is a kingdom made for cars. But for its women, who are barred from driving, even picking up the dry cleaning is considered subversive. Last spring, Manal al-Sharif, 32, a divorced mother of two, decided to take on the issue by posting on YouTube a video of herself driving the Saudi streets. Though al-Sharif was jailed for nine days and publicly shamed, she inspired a movement. An underground civil-disobedience campaign encouraged women to drive to the grocery store, the doctor’s office or the kids’ school. Those thankless errands may plague women elsewhere, but in Saudi Arabia, where they must rely on husbands, fathers and hired drivers to get around, they are a long-dreamed-of privilege.

Lifting the ban has gained much support, but it has also sparked a backlash. Other female drivers have been imprisoned, and some even lashed. But because of al-Sharif, Saudi women are beginning to get in the driver’s seat.

Baker is TIME‘s Middle East bureau chief

Read more: http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2111975_2111976_2112132,00.html #ixzz2D7od6xhE

A World of Possibilities

By Rick StengelWednesday, Apr. 18, 2012
dek

The nature of influence changes. The word originates from the medieval idea that a magical liquid emanates from the stars to influence our actions on earth. Modern influence often comes from the magical ability of technology and social media to overcome time and distance and reorder our perceptions. Before microphones and television were invented, a leader had to stand in front of a crowd and bellow. Now she can tweet a phrase that reaches millions in a flash. Influence was never easier — or more ephemeral.

Which is why we try to choose those people whose influence is both lasting and, with a few notable exceptions, laudable. The economist Elinor Ostrom, who is on our list this year, has written about the tragedy of the commons, which is the idea that self-interest can undermine the common good. We look for the antidote to this: how individuals can start a chain reaction of virtue, shaping events in ways that can become both viral and enduring.

We are living in a transformative period in which leadership and influence emerge in unlikely places. Manal al-Sharif posted on YouTube a video of herself driving in Saudi Arabia — women are barred from driving in the kingdom — and was jailed for nine days. Our categories — Breakouts, Pioneers, Moguls, Leaders and Icons — reflect the different types of influence demonstrated by people on the list. We look for those whose influence is at a tipping point. In Russia, Alexei Navalny is harnessing the growth of Internet use to connect protesters via blogging. While there are new types of influence, some are as old as Adam. In Egypt, Samira Ibrahim demonstrated old-fashioned courage by standing up to the military in a court of law over forced “virginity tests.”

This year, as in the past two, the most influential person in putting together the TIME 100 list was executive editor Radhika Jones, who edited the issue with her characteristic devotion to both breadth and depth. Managing the thousands of details that this entails fell to associate editor Feifei Sun. The fresh, inventive design was the handiwork of senior art director April Bell.

Statistician Hans Rosling made this year’s list not only because of his years on the front lines of public health in Africa but also because of how he uses statistics to change people’s perceptions of the world. “I am not an optimist,” Rosling says. He describes himself instead as a “possibilist.” The TIME 100 list is about the infinite possibilities of influence and the power of influence to change the world.

Read more: http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2111975_2112273_2112271,00.html #ixzz2D7udmCuU

لنرتق بأفكارنا – مجموعة من تغريداتي


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قلت لصديقتي: تشرفت بلقاء الشيخ الدكتور (فلان). قالت: يقولون صار علماني. سألتها: هل تعرفين معنى علماني؟ قالت: لا

الشاهد في القصة: لا تستخدم كلمة لاتعرف معناها فقد تسبب لنفسك الإحراج. ولاتصدق كل مايقوله الناس عن فلان بل ابحث بنفسك عن الحقيقة. إذا كونت آرائك اعتماداً على ماينقله الناس لك فخطؤك سيكون أكثر من صوابك. لتعرف أحدهم اقرأ مايكتبه، شاهد مقابلاته وبرامجه، تعرف عليه من نهجه لا مما يقوله الناس. وهذا ينطبق على الأشخاص في حياتنا أيضا.

كيف ستتعلم الدروس من حياة الآخرين وتوسع مداركك إذا كنت لا تخالط إلا من يوافق آرائك وتفكيرك؟ تعلم من الجميع حتى من تختلف معه.

ليتنا نصرف الطاقات المهدرة في (هتك أستار) الآخرين للبحث عن نقاط الإلتقاء والعمل عليها من أجل هدف واحد وهو بناء الأمة.

ضاع عمره في نسج القصص الخيالية عن مؤامرات تحاك ضده وضاع جهده في مهاجمة طواحين الهواء. والعالم من حوله يتقدم وهولايبرح مكانه. ثم يلوم العالم،كل العالم، على تأخره.. وينسى نفسه .

الحق لا يحتاج لصراخك وتهديدك وسبابك.. الحق يفرض نفسه.. الحق يعلو بنفسه.. الحق مضيء بنفسه.. وفر طاقاتك أو راجع حساباتك..

قلب يشغله الحقد وذكر مساويء الخلق.. قلب تشفق عليه..

علمتني صروف الدهر ألا أهجو عدوي وألا أدافع عن نفسي أمام الإفتراءات.. فهجوك عدوك يعطيه الدافع لمهاجمتك أكثر ودفاعك يعطي الافتراءات مصداقية

نحن إما منشغلون في نقد الآخرين أو جلد الذات! وهذا لايترك وقتاً لما هو اسمى مني ومنك ومنهم ‎..

تريد: أن تصبح عميل وخائن وأجندات خارجية وصنيعة ايران؟ سهلة: طالب بأحد حقوقك! تحذير: بعد كل هذا سيتم تجاهلك أو ستنتحر

إذا طالبت بحق فلن تخرج عن أحد هؤلاء: ليبرالي، متمرد، شيعي، عميل ايراني، محرض، مخالف لولاة الأمر، طرش بحر..

انشغل بحياتك بدلاً من أن تنشغل بحياتهم ودعهم يراقبون.. فيموتون هماً ‎..

أشغل نفسك بتطويرها حتى لايبقى عندك الوقت لتنتقد الآخرين..